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Zach Nelson, NetSuite Never shy about labeling its competitors as stone age or pre-Internet, NetSuite has taken the battle to its advertising. The San Mateo, Calif.-based cloud software vendor is trashing SAP, one of its favorite targets, in an ad in the Wall Street Journal. The full-page promotion features a faux text conversation about an SAP implementation on the screen of a mobile device. Here’s the conversation: “Why is it taking so long to get our ERP up and running?” “It’s SAP. What can I do?” “You’re tired.”

“You’re darn right, I’m tired. Tired of SAP.” “I meant fired. Stupid autocorrect.” If you remember the prehistoric days when nobody got fired for buying IBM, NetSuite is suggesting people should be fired for buying SAP.  I’m sure NetSuite will have more to say about the new plans for SAP Business ByDesign. Given that Stone Age label that NetSuite Zach Nelson uses to trash competitors such as Sage and Dynamics, I can envision the company resurrecting the Neanderthals from earlier Geico ads (Who are a lot more interesting than the Gecko anyway.) Whatever the target competitor is, the NetSuite ad would say, “So ancient, even a caveman won’t use it” and show the evolution of mankind from Neanderthal through Sage and Great Plains to NetSuite users.

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